You’ve Got a Friend…in San Francisco?

10 min read

I officially have my first San Francisco friend! I’m a couple of weeks shy of my 6-month marker of living in the City and I can now boast a new friend. This friend was hard-earned. I am not a hermit, I am not shy, I smile at strangers, I say nice things to people, I shower regularly and smell good. Should be a friend magnet, right? No.  Hhhhheeelll no.

I couldn’t even get hit on here. Usually if there’s one thing I can count on in life, it’s that a creepy guy with no sense of personal boundaries will hit on me. Not only did I feel friendless, but ugly. Maybe I don’t smell as good as I think I do.

Making friends in a new city can be tough - especially in San Francisco. | Read more from "You've Got a Friend in San Francisco" on  The Girl Next Door is Black

The city is pretty cool, but what about the people?

As I often do when I have questions about life, I turned to Google. Google, why is it so hard to meet people and make friends in San Francisco? Google had all kinds of answer for me from the condescendingly unhelpful (“It’s so easy! Just get of your house and talk to people.” Shut. Up.) to a post titled, “Top 10 Reasons I Hate San Francisco. The reasons listed didn’t really resonate with me and I believe it was written with humorous intent. However, the comments section was a revelation. In a city where some residents seem to have a cult-like passion and exuberance for said city – akin to the insane levels of excitement you’d find in Oprah’s audience on a “My Favorite Things” show; nobody is giving you a car, calm down – I was surprised to find this seemingly small faction of San Francisco dissenters. One commenter stated:

I also loved the city when I first moved here (because I was still a tourist), but it got worse over time, not better. I have lived in San Francisco for two years now, and I hate it more than I ever did. Don’t get me wrong – I love the city and the bay area, but the people really suck here. I have never met so many cold, distant, unfriendly, rude, selfish, insular, stuck up people in one place! The east bay is a little better, but not much.

Cold. Distant. Unfriendly. Insular. I felt all those things.

Another commenter added:

I have never felt more strongly about something in my life. San Francisco is extremely clicky[sic]. It could take 2 years to get on the inside of a click because people are so distant and self preserving and guarded. Everyone has their forcefield up and it is designed to keep you out, along with everyone else they don’t know. My advice would be not to bother. Just cut your losses and leave now before you get bitter about the people here.

Hmm. Sounded like people at work. I could also feel the bitterness building. This anonymous poster was speaking directly to me.

For advice, I called an L.A. friend who moved to Seattle almost two years ago. At a party, if I’m cracking wise in a small group, she is

Making friends in a new city can be tough - especially in San Francisco. | Read more from "You've Got a Friend in San Francisco" on  The Girl Next Door is Black

Not just the city that’s cold?

the party. If anyone could give me advice on making friends, she could. She told me about the “Seattle Freeze.” The Seattle Freeze is a newer term for the feelings of exclusion and insularity newbies feel from Seattleites. She theorized that Seattle residents encounter so many transplants, it tires them; they become desensitized and seek refuge in their cliques. Others blame: the Norwegians?

She admitted that after only a year and a half, having been adopted into a couple of cliques, she was guilty of perpetuating the ice-out. I don’t think we have an above-average number of Norwegians here, but it sounds like San Francisco to me. She reassured me that I was doing all the right things: saying yes to (most) invitations, trying to infiltrate cliques, taking initiative and extending invitations to people, being friendly when I’m out and joining activities. Just one thing though: it’s going to take time. I hate time. Take your time and shove it! Time is never on my side. When I’m lying prone on the floor, bawling and rolling around, desperately wishing for the heart-squeezing pain to end, because some guy broke my heart, the clock ticks like it’s mocking me. Hours seems to take years to pass. Snails laugh as they sail by. On the other hand, when I’m on vacation, thinking how much I love life and never want to leave, and why can’t I have Beyonce-money and just travel all the time, suddenly time is on speed, running as fast as it can, like it’s a damn race. Jerk.

Time. Ugh. But, it is what it is (don’t you hate when people say that?).

During this time, there are four avenues I’ve taken toward making friends – with varying levels of success.

Work

Some will warn you against making friendly with co-workers. I say bullshit. Several of my closest friends are former co-workers. I wouldn’t give them back. Just be smart about whom you associate with and trust. The heifer down the hall that gives you looks that say she hopes you fall on your face in a pool of acid-rain wastewater and is constantly throwing others under the bus, is not a good candidate for friendship.

Making friends in a new city can be tough - especially in San Francisco. | Read more from "You've Got a Friend in San Francisco" on  The Girl Next Door is Black

How I sometimes feel in San Francisco. Photo cr: kainr, flickr.com

The weekend after the torturous wine-tasting with the private social club, I was feeling particularly black and tired. At less than 6%, San Francisco’s black population is the smallest I’ve ever been among, having lived in seven other major US cities. The city has been hemorrhaging so many black folks in the past 40 years, a task force was created to determine the cause and nip it. It’s weeeiird. I’ve written before about how I feel people treat and approach (or don’t approach me) me differently here. Crystal Sykes wrote a thoughtful piece about hipster racism in San Francisco and how awkward it can be as the only black person among a group of friends (read the comments; the discussion is fascinating). As a black male friend and former Berkeley resident summed up:

“…I always would think it’s just in my head or I’m being hypersensitive, until I would leave the Bay Area. Despite being the only Black person I saw in my several trips to Santa Fé, NM, everyone there made me feel like I belonged – and it wasn’t at all forced. I merely concluded that they made everyone feel like they belonged there, and that was just the culture. But I was suspicious that I had a doppelgänger in Santa Fé who had been a longtime resident, and everyone thought I was him. Los Angeles, New York, even Houston – none of those places gave me that out-of-place feeling that shopping at Andronico’s on Shattuck in North Berkeley or waiting in line at Cheeseboard pizza gave me. Only on campus or on Telegraph Avenue was that feeling relatively absent. It’s such a subtle thing, and virtually impossible to explain to someone who isn’t experiencing it, but cumulatively it weighs on you.”

Amen.

In December, I wrote about going dancing with one of my co-workers, whom I’ll refer to as Mercy since I am listening to the song as I write this. She is also the first co-worker who mercifully extended a hand of friendship to me when I was aching for human interaction two months in. After the dancing night, we’ve had lunch at work a few times and were friendly. But, recently our budding friendship hit a major milestone: self-disclosure.

I ran into her in the office the weekend after the wine tasting fail. Mercy is also black (one of the 3% in the company) . When she asked me about my weekend I told her about the wine tasting weirdness. Then, I blurted out, “I have to ask you something…how do you deal with being one of so few black professionals in San Francisco? I just don’t know if I can take this or want to take this.” We chatted about it for a little while, but we had to get back to work.

The following weekend, I received a surprise text from her saying, “We need to finish our conversation about being black in SF.” A weekend text out of the blue? This is MAJOR. It was particularly poignant given I’d just finished eating lunch at a restaurant, alone. She asked if I wanted to grab tea and continue our chat. We met in Japantown at the cutest tea shop/café and I just exhaled a lot of the stress I’d been feeling over the past 4-5 months. She totally got it. She said that after over 7 years of living here, she’s gotten used to it, for better or worse. She relies on her friends for support. Her friends treat her like Mercy, not black Mercy.

It wasn’t all about me though. I am not that person. She disclosed some stuff of her own, which I will not be sharing for the sake of her privacy. Tea led to us seeing a movie (Life of Pi) and tentative plans for all the cool things we can do in the future. It was like a cool, awesome date. We’ve hung out since then too (and did some more self-disclosing). I like her. She’s intelligent, thoughtful, fun and has an appealing mix of openness and strength that I don’t encounter often enough. She’s affable and she’s my new friend. And look what I came in to work to find from her one Monday morning!

Making friends in a new city can be tough - especially in San Francisco. | Read more from "You've Got a Friend in San Francisco" on  The Girl Next Door is Black

How sweet is this?

The group of girls I went to happy hour with a couple of months ago, have continued extending happy hour invites. A few months ago people were rudely discussing their excitement, in my presence, about the happy hour I wasn’t invited to after work. Now, I am regularly being invited to happy hours (By a different group. I didn’t want to hang out with those other people anyway. Humph!). They remind me of some of my friends from college.

I sit in a new prison cube and my current neighbors are much more sociable than the former. The old neighbors were (mostly) nice enough, but quiet. Silence makes the day draaaaaag. On one side of my new seat, is a woman around my age from a country in Latin America. She’s been in the US for less than two years. She is very expressive, open, a close-talker, somewhat unfiltered and effervescent. I was drawn to her pretty immediately because I loved her energy and she also seemed open to friendship.

She often (hilariously) laments to me how she doesn’t understand people here. But, “here” for her is the United States. She’s only ever lived in San Francisco. Having lived in several different cities across multiple states, I felt quite confident in telling her: This is San Francisco; the bizarro behavior you just witnessed is not generalizable to the US as a whole. We’re both feeling like fish out of water, but for different reasons. It’s comforting having her to talk to when I have those “WTF?!” moments. On the other side is my neighbor who wants to put *NSYNC posters up on our shared wall. I could not be happier…with my neighbors.

Private Social Club

You will not be advancing on my tour of friendship.Get off my bus. Bye.

My Friend Has a Friend

Making friends in a new city can be tough - especially in San Francisco. | Read more from "You've Got a Friend in San Francisco" on  The Girl Next Door is Black

My friend, L, arrived in San Francisco when I was really missing the comforts of home. Mood booster x 10.

I am so in love with my other friends (and my family) right now. They have been the biggest source of support for me during this adjustment. Whether it be supportive comments on my blog posts, Skype chats, phone calls, emails or visits, I have never been more grateful for the knowledge that someone else out there cares about me. A few of my friends have kindly offered to hook me up with other friends they have in the City. There’s no guarantee that your friends will like each other. I have friends from all kinds of groups and I know some of them do not like the others. Hehe.

When my L.A. friend “E” came up for a visit, she introduced me to her former co-worker, J, at brunch. It didn’t take long for me to like J. Her energy is enviable. If I could bottle her into a trendy energy-drink I’d have baller money. The feeling seemed mutual as we exchanged emails and phone numbers that day. I’ve made plans with J for a follow-up brunch. So, there’s potential.

One of my L.A. girlfriends/co-worker/work wife moved up here two months before I did. We actually work at the same company – again – but, in different departments. Unfortunately, she has some family stuff going on and a boyfriend that’s kept her busy, so we surprisingly haven’t seen each other much. Though that is changing. I’m so thankful she was here to celebrate my birthday with me! She grew up in the Bay Area and knows some people here. She’s shared one of her friends with me, another former Angeleno who owns a trendy boutique in the city. I like that she’s not in tech as I’m starting to really tire of tech people (if I never hear the word “start-up” again…). She seems to know an interesting blend of people and set up a good social network for herself in the few years she’s been here.

Girlfriend Circles

Girlfriend Circles has been the best route for making friends, of the XX variety at least.

I’ve been on the site for just about two months and met some really dynamic women. I moved here in hopes of meeting, um, more uh, intellectual people (I’m not saying they don’t exist in L.A., some of them are my friends!) and I definitely have with this group. During one dinner I was grouped with two published authors, one of whom was also a chocolatier (seriously, how many people can claim that as a career!), a software engineer, a physician and a paralegal. They were all in my age group as many events are segmented by age; it really helps. It was a fun and engaging dinner and we all agreed we’d like to meet up again as a group.

In addition to attending official “circles”, I’ve hung out with some of the girls outside of the circles , after the initial meets – which is ultimately the point.

There’s M- (the paralegal) and Ra-(also a software engineer), whom I met around the same time and had met each other a couple of months prior. They’re chill and down-to-earth. I’ve gone hiking and to dinners with them.

CC is an enigma to me. She’s an accountant by profession, but loves to sing and listen to opera. She’s quirky and dresses fabulously avant-garde. It’s fun to see what she’ll wear next. I have a feeling she’s not for everyone, but I think she’s interesting. We went out to have dessert one night and she casually mentioned Kim Kardashian. I have never been so happy to hear that vacuous girl’s name. Yeah, I like to be intellectual and hoity-toity and all, but I am also the girl who loves her US Weekly. A good pop-culture chat does an overly-taxed mind good (spending all day in a staid corporate environment, where I have to be on my best behavior all the day long, means I need some levity and fun outside of work). You can also combine the two and arrogantly wax on about how Kim’s popularity represents the downfall of societal values.

The dinner group had scheduled a brunch for a couple of weekends later. Unfortunately, only Jo, H-, Ra- and I could make it. Brunch was fun; the conversation flowed freely. Ra- had to leave early, but the rest of us lingered awhile after the bill was paid. We somehow ended up on the topic of shopping (go figure) and decided to check out the shops in Jo’s neighborhood. At one store,  I found a hot pair of shoes and as I debated buying them, they both encouraged me to go for it since they were on sale and so cute. These are my kind of girls: shopping enablers. After shopping, Jo invited H- and I to her apartment for a drink. We spent the next few hours planted on her comfortable chairs, listening to music, and chatting about all manner of topics: cooking, dating, marriage, careers and how I think I’m having an early mid-life crisis. They were amused by my random knowledge from falling into Wikipedia holes. It was supportive, engaging, funny and comfortable.

Making friends in a new city can be tough - especially in San Francisco. | Read more from "You've Got a Friend in San Francisco" on  The Girl Next Door is Black

These make me happy

I knew this trio really had potential when we were talking about cutting the cord from expensive cable and H- said, “I want to get rid of cable, but I need Bravo.” She didn’t say it ironically and pretend like she would never dare watch such treacle. She was sheepish, but owned it. Did I mention I’m a Real Housewives junkie? I’m an OG viewer. I started with episode one of The Real Housewives of Orange County all those years ago. She’s more into Top Chef, but I can dig it. I love good food, but it frustrates me to watch people cooking good food on TV that I can’t eat with them! Bravo disciples know there is something not right with the hold that station has on their viewing habits, but most of us accept it, ignore our feelings of cognitive dissonance and tune in. Jo, H- and I hung out again this weekend and had just as much fun as the last time. This shows promise, but I’m not counting my chickens just yet…

I’m nearing the point where I’ll have to shift focus from meeting new people to building the friendships I’m developing. It’s already becoming a challenge to fit in repeat dates with the new dates. I understand what Rachel Bertsche meant in MWF Seeking BFF. It’s a great problem to have though; it certainly beats sitting at home contemplating ways to reuse all the fur my cats shed (I’ve got nothin’!). Besides, meeting new people all the time is exhausting. However, I’m not going to pull it back just yet. This is just the beginning. It’s finally starting to become fun. I am hopeful and curious to see what’s in store over the next few months on my tour of friendship.

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23 Comments
  • Emily
    October 16, 2015

    Thanks for sharing! My husband and I are moving to San Francisco in a few weeks and I your article was really helpful.

  • Dan
    May 2, 2015

    I hate to say it but I’m a native, been here my whole life. Sadly, San Francisco isn’t the same city it was before, and maybe it’s just me, but I do want to move to the east bay. I’m a pretty Americanized Latino young man, and the racism from both sides is pretty apparent. I speak Spanish very eloquently but not keen to slang and regular conversation so I don’t really fit in with Latin culture. On the other hand, I’m every bit as American as the next guy, but, when you work at an art gallery for years and a guy walks through the door and says hi to everyone except you, the only brown dude… It’s unsettling.

    Still, I’ve managed to make a few great friends over the years. People from all sorts of backgrounds now that I think of it. I won’t ever have a ton of likes on Facebook, but I’m happy I know my buddies.

    I’m always happy to make friends, and I can’t be the only one. Good luck out there! (kik: falcon punch if you need another buddy in Sf)

    • The Girl Next Door is Black
      May 4, 2015

      when you work at an art gallery for years and a guy walks through the door and says hi to everyone except you, the only brown dude… It’s unsettling.

      Yes! This is a great (but unfortunate) example of the type of ethnic & racial micro-aggressions I experience in SF that is hard for some people to understand. People may not mean to stereotype or treat you differently, but they do it anyhow (sometimes unconsciously) and it can leave you feeling othered and isolated. I remember going to a women’s event here and having the check-in staff give me a look like “are you lost?” Most everyone at the event was white with a few Asian people. So awkward.

      Thank you for sharing!

  • Sibu
    October 23, 2014

    Such a fun post!
    I’m new to California (and the U.S.). My husband and I moved here from London almost a year ago – and living in Walnut Creek hasn’t made making friends easy.

    I’m black, South African born but my husband is American & his family is in the east coast, so we have no one around that we

    • The Girl Next Door is Black
      October 23, 2014

      Wow, welcome to the US! What do you think so far (aside from not knowing many people)?

      Are there any South African-centered groups in the area?

  • Caty Häberling
    July 12, 2014

    Hello!
    Good to hear that there is other out there who is new here in SF and not just only me. 🙂
    I just moved here from Norway since august 2013 but I, have been traveling a lot so I haven’t done anything yet neither any connection.

    I just google and found your blog, I totally understand what you mean…
    If it’s not too late would be fun to have a chat? 🙂

    Here is my instagram :p http://instagram.com/seahorse727

  • Jasmine Black
    July 30, 2013

    I am a black female in my 30’s and moved to SF as a teen. Having moved to Oakland a few years ago I have to say that yes SF is a place for stuck up tourists who are cold and uppity. No middle class just rich or poor. When I first moved to SF in the late 90’s it seemed more diverse and unique but lately I don’t even want to come visit because the wannabes have taken over.

  • sepultura13
    May 3, 2013

    I experienced the “Seattle Freeze-Out” when I lived there from 1991 – 2002 on a major scale, but I also shattered the walls of some of the cliques! No shrinking violet am I…but yes, the heavy Scandinavian influence might have something to do with it. Once you get past their reticence and aloof façade, I’ve found many Norwegians, Swedes, and Finns to be quite friendly – and their hospitality is nearly unmatched!

    On a side note – LOVE THOSE SHOES! 😎

    • thegirlnextdoorisblack
      May 6, 2013

      Yeah, I was fascinated when I read about the possible reasons for the Seattle Freeze! Good for you for cracking the ice! 😉

      And the shoes? Weeks later, still so very pretty. 🙂

      • sepultura13
        May 11, 2013

        It took a while to break the ice, I’ll admit…two years for me, not just a matter of a few months! 😀

  • Heidi
    April 26, 2013

    Yes,,,, it’s getting better! So glad to hear it. And don’t worry, I’m the one home wondering what to do with all the cat hair, so I have an answer to that question: http://www.ninelivestwine.com/hand-spun-yarn.html

    Yes, it’s real. There are a lot of sites. :/

  • Trista Overby
    April 23, 2013

    I enjoyed reading your blog! I recently moved to S.F. and I can totally relate being an African American female. I enjoy the city, but feel out of place at times because I haven’t met any black friends. I have tried the meetup site to find that most groups that I would be interested in are across the bay in Oakland. This is my 2nd month here and I haven’t found a job yet, but I’m pretty sure things will get better once I start working..hehe Glad to hear you are adjusting well. Take care!

    • thegirlnextdoorisblack
      April 24, 2013

      Thanks for reading! I hope you find a job you want soon. I hope your transition is a breeze! 🙂

  • The Wanderlust Gene
    April 15, 2013

    Brava! Perseverance leads to first successes 🙂

  • Jaclyn
    April 15, 2013

    So glad you made a new friend that “gets it.” See you this weekend for outdoor fun and booze.

  • cielorasca
    April 14, 2013

    Yay!!! And those shoes are fabulous! I’m glad you were convinced to make the purchase.

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