Tanzania: Safari – Tarangire National Park

4 min read

I arrived in Moshi on a Friday night after 18 hours of flying and my exciting visa adventure. I’m in Moshi to volunteer teach at a school geared toward female empowerment through education. Four volunteers were already in town when I arrived. I hadn’t gotten a chance to meet them when I arrived at the volunteer house as they’d all gone to the Serengeti fiesta and two of them were hungover. The party sounds epic: it was held in a stadium with at least 3000 attendees, including Maasai tribe members who seem to be quite popular.

The other volunteers planned a weekend safari trip including me and I got up early to join them. G_  is a very tall South Carolinian in his mid-20s, with boundless amounts of energy, a loud voice and an extremely inquisitive nature. In addition to G_, there is: M_ from Finland, also in his mid-20s,  and he’s definitely Finnish: tall, strapping, & broad. He has a deep voice and speaks slightly accented English. He also speaks French, Spanish and German.  K_ is a kind-looking blonde, half-German/half Dutch, but has been in the US for at least 20 years and her adult son, J_ is biracial: his father is a black American. He’s in his early 20s, slender with a swimmer’s build and seems chill. They live in Northern California. Everyone seems friendly. I just met these people 30 minutes prior and I’m going on a weekend trip with them. I hope they are sane. Our safari driver is Grayson and he is assisted by Zak, a Maasai, who dresses in traditional Maasai clothing. They are both very welcoming. We’ll be heading to Tarangire National Park and Ngorongoro Crater.

Our safari truck

Our safari truck

We all bonded quickly on the 3-hour drive to Tarangire. The volunteers have all traveled a lot and have fascinating stories to tell. G_ had just spent the past year and a half teaching English in Southwest China. M_ and I took a photo together on the way to the park and G_ declared, in his booming voice, “M_ and Keisha, our newest couple.” M_ is cute, so I had no objections and apparently he didn’t either as our whirlwind “relationship” became a running joke throughout the weekend.

TARANGIRE

Tarangire is the sixth largest national park in Tanzania. During the trek, we saw camouflaged lions lying in wait, salivating over zebras mingling with wildebeests; herds of elephants, antelope, beautifully-colored birds and giraffes.

Elephants in Tarangire National Park

Elephants in Tarangire National Park

Wildebeests

Wildebeests

Zebras

Zebras

Giraffes

Giraffes

We took a lunch break in the park. While eating we met a precocious young boy of about 10-years old, from Oman, named Hilal. He and G_ took a liking to each other right away with their very sociable personalities. Their conversation was highly amusing:

Hilal to G_: “Where are you from?”

G_: “The United States.”

Hilal in wonderment: “Oh man, the United States? I am dreaming!”

G_: “Where are you from?”

Hilal: “Oman.” G: “What’s Oman like?”

Hilal: “We have X-Box and Wii! And I’m getting a Playstation soon!”

Ah yes, all the important things for a young boy. We ran into him two more times on the safari. At the park exit, he and G_ exchanged email addresses so they can write to each other. Their fast friendship is adorable.

Safari Lunch

Safari Lunch

Later that evening we arrived at Haven Nature Lodge  in Lake Manyara where we stayed for the night. The camp has permanent tents and the tent I shared with K_ had two twin beds and an electric outlet which I immediately used to charge my dead electronics. Electricity can be hard to come by here.

At dinner we discussed politics. I was hoping to get away from talk of politics given the 2012 US Presidential election is driving me batty. Ah well. The conversation ran the gamut from my hatred of the state of Florida; heads of state of different countries; America’s obsession with race; colorism in different ethnic groups; capitalism vs. socialism and weed. We were all even-keeled and well-behaved and there were no tears, fights or name-calling. Yep, it is possible to talk politics and race and be civilized. Zak, one of our guides, innocently asked the Americans if bears eat people. He’s never seen one. He’s as fascinated by bears as we are the lions. We told him that bears are much like rhinos and elephants: they are large, intimidating and can hurt humans if they feel threatened, but generally do not care to eat us.

Nighttime performers

After dinner we were treated to a show around a bonfire by a local polygamist tribe. They sang a welcome song, “Jambo, Bwana”, and a few of us joined them in their song and dance. The song is catchy and fun. The tribe sang a few more songs and performed a couple of skits. Iwas moved to tears. I guess I was mourning the loss of a rich African culture that African-Americans had taken away from us.

After the show dispersed I made friendly with a few of the stragglers: two young women, Canadian Ky_, American V_ and an African man, B_ .  V_ had been in Tanzania for a month with a UN program. B_ runs a tour group in Tanzania. He enjoys taking tourists off-the-beaten path. He and V_ met on one of his tours and became fast friends. He took a few days break to join Ky_ and V_ on their adventures. Ky , who reminds me of Amanda Seyfried, had the opportunity to spend time with the Hadzabe tribe and said she wants to join them. B_ laughed at her comment and told her that perhaps she should learn the language first before joining. She’s comical and sweet. I asked B_ how he thinks it is that traditional tribes in Tanzania are able to maintain their culture without being influenced by Western culture. Ky_ chimed in that there is a tribe where up until a few years ago the women who used to go bare-breasted are now covering up and the men who wore loincloths now wear shorts. They’ve discovered modesty. It’s a difficult balance. It’s an engaging discussion, the type that makes traveling worth it. I bid them farewell after a while and told Ky_ that I look forward to seeing her on NatGeo in the Hadzabe tribe one day.

I intended to go to bed, but I spotted M_ and J_, my volunteer-mates, hanging out with a large group of British kids who were smoking non-cigarettes. Even in Africa… They rapped to Nicki Minaj with thick Liverpool accents and it was so hilarious I wanted to video it, but one of the kids was afraid I’d YouTube it (I don’t YouTube anything). They ask me if I like any British rap artists and were unimpressed when I can’t name it. They are young and nuts and I needed to go bed, so off I went after further unimpressing them by telling them I like Elton John.

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8 Comments
  • theh2obaby
    March 9, 2013

    Okay, this is just getting weird now. I was in Tarangire in October 2012. And yes, Tanzania is a remarkable, fragile, powerful place. Thanks for sharing your experiences. I need to write more fully about mine, but you know, life moves on and Africa feels so far away and dreamlike as soon as the plane leaves the ground. (I’ll just go now and see if I can find out why you hate Florida. If you lived there, too, I’m going to suspect that one of us is stalking the other.) ~molly

    • thegirlnextdoorisblack
      March 11, 2013

      Haha, you’re funny. 🙂 I haven’t lived in Florida, though I’ve visited. There are just often a lot of um…interesting stories coming out of Florida. I’ll leave it at that in case you are from there as I don’t want to offend. 🙂

      “life moves on and Africa feels so far away and dreamlike as soon as the plane leaves the ground”

      This is so very true. It seems unreal that I was there. I loved it and can’t wait to go back and explore more African countries. Thanks for reading!!

  • Eliza
    September 7, 2012

    I think you should become a travel writer

  • michelle
    September 2, 2012

    This is great, K! I’m enjoying keeping up with your adventures through this blog. I wish I could be there, but this is the next best thing. Looking forward to a post about your class discussion about divorce and whether your FB marital status needs to be updated! ;-).

    I wanted to acknowledge your sadness at being isolated from and deprived of African culture thanks to our history…I’m not eloquent enough to do that loss the justice it deserves. But, in short, it sucks. Love you!

  • Laura
    August 31, 2012

    I’m really glad you have this blog. You have a real talent for writing engaging accounts of your adventures. I loved the part about the bear….who would have thought? Btw, loving the lomo shots.

    • thegirlnextdoorisblack
      September 1, 2012

      Thanks, Laura! I do want to make sure what I write is intesting and relatable, so I appreciate your feedback (and reading)! 🙂

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